Dunsborough now connected to the nbn

Nbn field engineer Richard Barnard is showing Federal member for Forrest Nola Marino the new fibre to the node box in Dunsborough. They are pictured with City of Busselton mayor Grant Henley and councillor Rob Bennett.
Nbn field engineer Richard Barnard is showing Federal member for Forrest Nola Marino the new fibre to the node box in Dunsborough. They are pictured with City of Busselton mayor Grant Henley and councillor Rob Bennett.

Residents in parts of Dunsborough, Marybrook and Quindalup now have the opportunity to access the nbn network.

More than 2600 homes and businesses can switch to the network after it went live on Friday, May 5.

A further 1800 premises in the rest of Dunsborough and Eagle Bay are expected to be able to connect next month.

The federal government began the national broadband network in 2009 in the aim to provide fast internet to anyone across the country.

The network is delivered to customers in different ways depending on where you live in the Australia.

There is the fixed-line connection which can be fibre to the node, fibre to the premises fibre to the building and fibre hybrid coaxial.

People can also connect to the fixed wireless network from a tower or satellite.

Federal member for Forrest Nola Marino was in town for the switch and said it provided a “fabulous opportunity” for the people of Dunsborough.

City of Busselton mayor Grant Henley said it was great to see Dunsborough could now access the network.

“Busselton residents and businesses have already been connected and businesses in particular have been reporting good results,” he said.

Nbn state corporate affairs manager Ebony Aitken said with the rollout gaining momentum in the state the switch on for Dunsborough was exciting news. 

Mrs Marino also mentioned there was community confusion over the expectation of what nbn could provide.

“People think that they get the fastest bandwidth straight away but it actually depends on what plan you are on with your internet service provider,” she said.

She said the best way to guarantee a good service was to look at the nbn website which showed what you need to know before connecting to the network.

As a result of the confusion the Broadband Performance Monitoring and Reporting program began at the start of April in a bid to provide a clear indication of what internet speeds people were actually getting. The program is being implemented by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and will source performance data from around 4000 customers from across the country. As part of this program the ACCC will be recruiting householders using the national broadband fixed-line network to take part.

Have your say, have you had any problems connecting to nbn? Will it change the way you run your business? email jemillah.dawson@fairfaxmedia.com.au