Opposition leader Liza Harvey visits Busselton ahead of Liberal Party conference

Vasse MLA Libby Mettam and opposition leader Liza Harvey who was in Busselton to meet with community members ahead of next year's state election.
Vasse MLA Libby Mettam and opposition leader Liza Harvey who was in Busselton to meet with community members ahead of next year's state election.

WA opposition leader Liza Harvey was in Busselton on Tuesday to speak at a breakfast hosted by the region's Chamber of Commerce and Industry branches.

The talk was held ahead of the Liberal Party conference which takes place in Bunbury on Wednesday and Thursday this week.

While in Busselton, Ms Harvey also met with a number community organisations to talk about issues with youth, mental health and the airport.

"We talked with people about the need for a youth crime intervention officer in Busselton, there are a lot of young people here and there is a need to have some of those officers based here," she said.

"We are meeting with the City of Busselton to find out what their plans are into the future, and there will obviously be a few issues raised I expect with the airport and the dualling of the Bussell Highway.

"We remain committed to seeing the airport project completed, we previously allocated $15 million to fund the expansion of the airport."

Ms Harvey said their party also remained committed to the Royalties for Regions program which had funded projects throughout regional WA.

"We had some really good projects which were canned by this government, which is a bit unfortunate, Busselton airport is one of them," she said.

"With the take up of direct flights and the popularity of those there will be a business case to underpin the redevelopment of the airport."

Ms Harvey was also meeting with mental health workers about the need for a mental health specialist to be based at the Busselton Health Campus.

"It was always intended with the hospital development that there would be a mental health specialist, a nurse practioner at the very least, who specialised in mental health issues," she said.

"That has not eventuated and has placed an unfair burden on families in this region who need to make that trip to Bunbury.

"If you have a mental health crises you do not need to be in a car driving for half an hour to then wait in a bigger hospital in an unfamiliar place to get treatment."

Ms Harvey said there was a need to address the new on-demand transport registration system because there was a real risk regional WA could lose their taxi services.