Two fires ignite during the hot weather

Abbey photographer Paul Pichugin captured these images of helicopters putting out the fire near Vasse last week, which sparked during the hot weather. The temperature soared to 38.3 and was eight degrees above average.

Abbey photographer Paul Pichugin captured these images of helicopters putting out the fire near Vasse last week, which sparked during the hot weather. The temperature soared to 38.3 and was eight degrees above average.

Two fires in the Busselton region ignited in last week’s hot weather with the first fire occurring at a Jindong farm.

A Department of Fire and Emergency Services spokesperson said the helicopter was sent to Vasse to put out a fire that was inaccessible by vehicles.

A Department of Fire and Emergency Services spokesperson said the helicopter was sent to Vasse to put out a fire that was inaccessible by vehicles.

The fire started in a hay shed creating a lot of smoke in the area and was monitored throughout the day as it continued to smoulder.

A Department of Fire and Emergency Services spokesperson said it was easy for anything not green to catch fire in summer.

The fire burned through 1.5 hectares of bushland near Vasse and took firefighters just over an hour to extinguish the flames which was given the all clear at 3pm.

The fire burned through 1.5 hectares of bushland near Vasse and took firefighters just over an hour to extinguish the flames which was given the all clear at 3pm.

WAFarmers executive officer policy Grady Powell said haystacks should have a decent firebreak around them to minimise the chance of a fire spreading.

He said fires could be caused by a range of factors, including contact with sparks from machinery. 

Mr Powell said they could also spontaneously combust, which was usually caused by hot weather conditions in combination with excess moisture in the haystack.

”While regular monitoring of haystacks could prevent a fire breaking out, this is not always the case,” he said. 

WAFarmers recommends farmers watch for signs of heating hay, such as steam rising, mould growth, unusual odours and slumping.

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