Vale David Reid 1933 to 2017

David Reid, who died on Friday, aged 84, once jokingly said if you blinked you would have missed his time as an MP.

David Reid OAM sadly passed away on Friday, leaving his wife Jacynth, a son, two daughters and 10 grandchildren.

David Reid OAM sadly passed away on Friday, leaving his wife Jacynth, a son, two daughters and 10 grandchildren.

Though he spent  a total of  less than two years in two houses  of parliament as a Country Party member, WA's Legislative Assembly and the Senate, his brief periods as an MP were due to circumstances beyond his control.

A redistribution and then a double dissolution.

But he was able to achieve something that was unique. He represented all three tiers of government, as he later spent time on two councils, Bridgetown-Greenbushes, where he became shire president and Busselton.

"Being a member of three levels of government in Australia is quite a rare thing," he told the Busselton Oral History Group last year.

He believed  being awarded an OAM for his services to conservation and the environment was his  biggest achievement as it  was an indication of his contribution to the community.

He served on more than 30 committees in his public life, which covered a diverse range of  subjects. Among them were chair of the Busselton Water Board and chair of the Busselton Settlement Art project, which he initiated.

Though he was a  farmer in Bridgetown, David and his wife Jacynth had a long connection with Busselton, holidaying  there regularly before moving permanently to the town and building a home that overlooked the historic Busselton Jetty.

Jacynth recalled that when they came on holidays they brought their pet cats and dogs, two sheep to eat the grass as well as their chooks so they could have fresh farm eggs for breakfast.

Born in Bridgetown on the 10th May, 1933 and where he farmed after attending the Denmark  Agriculture College, David was a reluctant politician.

He was asked to run for the Lower House seat of Blackwood, which was dissolved after a boundary redistribution less than two years into his term and was later elected  to fill a casual vacancy in the Senate, which lasted only a few months following a double dissolution in the lead up to arguably Australia's most controversial political event, the dismissal of the Whitlam Government by the Governor General.

He later turned his attention to local government and was a member of the Busselton Council during its transition from a shire to a city.

In an interview with the  oral history group said he had had an amazing life in some respects. While it had not been  very successful in longevity, in the context of experience it was massive.

When I spoke to him only  hours before he passed away, in his usual modest way, he said he did not feel he had achieved anything special in his life.

"I was just an ordinary person," he said.

His list of community contributions says something different.