Vale Terry Alder

If Busselton ever had a larrikin, then it was Terry Alder.

From the pranks he played on people when he was working for the Busselton Post Office to his 'red hot' tips on the races, his effervescent personality was always evident.

Terry prided himself on his "influential" letter to one of the local newspapers on who he thought should be elected to council.

Vale Terry Alder, his funeral service will be held at 11am in the Bantry Chapel, 105 Bussell Highway, West Busselton  on Friday.

Vale Terry Alder, his funeral service will be held at 11am in the Bantry Chapel, 105 Bussell Highway, West Busselton on Friday.

He was usually on the money, unlike some of his horse racing tips.

Terry died doing something he loved, swimming. He had a heart attack while doing laps at the Geographe Leisure Centre and never recovered.

His death notice, touching on his age and which he could easily have written, because of his jovial outlook on life, said in part; 83 in cricket is a good innings, 83 in golf needs more practice, 83 years of age was a life well lived.

In his younger days he was a good sportsman, particularly at golf, cricket and squash.

"He took a dollar off me just before he died," his regular golfing partner Barry Green said.

Terry also was a surf lifesaver, taught table tennis, was a water skier and played tennis.

He certainly had a life well lived.

He had a number of nicknames. One was the coach, as he was always ready to help anybody, including juniors at squash and golf.

Another nickname was Centre Bet, for his golf ball always landed in the middle of the fairway.

He first made his mark in Busselton when he joined the post office, having come from the Gold Coast in 1964 as a "temporary" move. He was to meet his wife Aileen at the post office.

He also liked to tell people he opened Busselton's first restaurant.

His partner in the venture, former councillor John Reid, said the town only had pubs or a cafe where you could eat before they opened their steakhouse in 1969.

Terry was also very civic minded.

He liked the beachfront and was on the Busselton Jetty Advisory committee and was quick to draw attention, as shown in the photo, to what needed to be done around town, in this case the  crumbling seawall on the foreshore.

"Terry offered his help and advice to anybody and made a difference to a lot of people," Barry said.