Foodlosphy starts in the South West to give back

Foodlosphy owners Sam and Dan Ninnes in the kitchen. To find our more about the not-for-profit please visit the website foodlosophy.com.au/.
Foodlosphy owners Sam and Dan Ninnes in the kitchen. To find our more about the not-for-profit please visit the website foodlosophy.com.au/.

A not-for-profit organisation has started in the South West using the region's fresh produce to give back to those less fortunate.

Vasse chef Dan Ninnes and his wife Sam have started a not-for-profit food delivery service which will give back to help people in the community who are doing it tough.

Their mission is to create a more positive food culture within the lives of people in the community, and no mater what their place in life everybody deserves to eat good food everyday.

The organisation Foodlosophy has been running for the past six weeks and it works by people ordering a food box to be delivered to their home.

The boxes cater for all different types of eaters including classic, vegetarian, vegan and food allergies.

Mr Ninnes said the public response had been awesome, and they were trying to find a warehouse to produce their boxes that would fit eight kitchenettes to use as a teaching kitchen.

"Once we have built up more of a nest egg we can start investing in other areas to help out with the Anglican Church and Cliff's Kitchen," he said.

"Our board is made up of three chefs and another business owner, we will all volunteer our time and anything we have left over we will use to help feed the homeless and less fortunate.

"We have seen on social media a few times people who are looking for a bit of help, we are hoping to do that, everyone needs a bit of help sometimes.

"People are always running out of time or money and we thought let's get this going in the South West using local produce to save people time, money and wastage."

The organisation also plans to build up an appliance library where people can go to borrow a blender or other kitchen items they may not own.

After living in the region for four years, Mr Ninnes said they noticed how everyone in the community looked after one another.

"There are beautiful people living down here, it does not matter what the cause is everyone just looks after each other so we thought we had to do something to look after the whole community."